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Posts Tagged ‘flowers’

His name is Steven. He never failed to walk in front of our house everyday on the way to see his sick wife who had been living down the road in an adult group home (a place where they take care of mostly elderly people who can’t take care of themselves, usually because of physical and/or mental chronic illnesses). Rain or shine, we often saw him in the morning and back up the road to catch the bus home in the evening.

It wasn’t very often he stopped by (usually when he did, he asked for some flowers that grew in our yard or  hubby offered him some to bring to his wife)–whom, according to Steven, was half blind and had severe dementia.

steve2

Today my hubby told me that he chatted a bit with Steven, who told him that they (the place where his wife had been living) just put her on hospice or palliative care because she quit eating and drinking. Hospice is a program where medical personnel along with the patient (who is still cognitively able to think and make decisions), family members/caregivers agree to just give palliative care for a smooth transition to death. No hospital is needed when they’re sick. No treatments other than comfort treatments and care (usually to alleviate pain and sufferings) The team of hospice usually includes a doctor, nurse, nurse assistant, chaplain/pastor (or whoever they ask for religious/spiritual support) who come every so often to the patient’s residence (be it their own home, hospital, assisted living, nursing home etc) to monitor their condition. Occasionally, a patient in hospice lives more months/years than expected. Sometimes they get better, too. Often they transition to their eternal home within days/weeks or months.

When someone like Steve’s wife quit eating and drinking, it usually doesn’t take long to transition home….It’s just a matter of (short) time and hopefully, a quick, easy and peaceful one.

Update: Steven’s wife condition was getting worse so he had her transferred to another home. I haven’t seen him since.

(Picture taken by me. Being cautious, I don’t use Steven’s real name)

-D

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I have been waiting for spring—it’s supposed to be my favorite season. It’s supposed to bring light after dark, gloomy winter and indeed, it has been. What is it in me that’s longing for it–like a lonely soul lurking in the dark, waiting for some glimpse of light– Yet my (physical) body seems to resist it and it aches. My eyes are red, my head aches, my nose is runny. Some stiff joints. I feel fatigue and I have been tired.

I simply can't resist...

I simply can’t resist…

Spring is not the best of seasons. Cold and flu are two good reasons; wind and rain and other sorrow, warm today and cold tomorrow.

Spring is not the best of seasons.
Cold and flu are two good reasons;
wind and rain and other sorrow,
warm today and cold tomorrow. ~Author Unknown

 I don’t know how sickness can make one a little bit poetic but I feel like I finally meet my dream lover after a long and winding road and then get broken hearted. I can see that there is nothing about the ‘dream lover’ that is not to like: bright and sunny, warm and lovely, pretty and flowery. Everything about him is beautiful. You want to embrace his welcoming presence.

It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.

It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade. ~Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

 But…something about him makes me dizzy, moody and little gloomy. Or maybe I’ll just have to wait a little longer to get used to the lover’s presence. Maybe I’ll eventually adapt—to the abundant beauty and pain that he brings.

-D (Photos taken by me)

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